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2009.04.06 (Mon)

The Japanese Government Should Impose Comprehensive Sanctions on North Korea Covering Merchandise, Financial and Human Exchanges

April 6, 2009

Urgent Recommendations from JINF

The Japanese Government Should Impose Comprehensive Sanctions on North Korea Covering Merchandise, Financial and Human Exchanges
-- In Protest to North Korea’s Firing of Missile --

  On April 5, 2009, North Korea test-fired a long-range ballistic missile in what it called a satellite launch.
  Whatever is mounted at the top of the missile, North Korea’s test-firing of the ballistic missile is aimed primarily at securing nuclear attack capabilities against Japan and its ally, the United States, and poses grave threats to Japan’s security.
  United Nations Security Council (UNSC) Resolution 1695 on July 15, 2006, condemning North Korea’s test-firing of ballistic missiles, said the council expressed “grave concern at the launch of ballistic missiles by the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK), given the potential of such systems to be used as a means to deliver nuclear, chemical or biological payloads” and affirmed “that such launches jeopardize peace, stability and security in the region and beyond, particularly in light of the DPRK’s claim that it has developed nuclear weapons.” The resolution then demanded “that the DPRK suspend all activities related to its ballistic missile program” and required all U.N. member states “to exercise vigilance and prevent the procurement of missiles or missile-related items, materials, goods and technology from the DPRK, and the transfer of any financial resources in relation to the DPRK’s missile or WMD (weapons of mass destruction) programs.”
  The Japanese government has vowed to use its missile defense system for intercepting any missile if it were to fall on Japan’s territorial waters or land. Even if it were not to do so, the government has pledged to invoke its independent additional sanctions (including an embargo on exports to North Korea) and ask the UNSC to adopt a resolution condemning North Korea’s test-firing of the missile and calling for sanctions on that country. Leaders of many countries including the United States and South Korea have supported the attitude of the Japanese government.
  We at JINF appreciate those measures.
  Based on the appreciation, we here recommend the Japanese government to take the following actions:

 

Recommendations
- Invoke all-out sanctions and take measures to make UNSC Resolution 1695 and the like more effective.
  (1) Suspend official development aid and all other assistances to countries that fail to comply with the resolution and the like.
  (2) Block international organizations from providing any assistance to North Korea.
- Take measures to enhance Japan’s security capabilities and make the Japan-U.S. alliance more effective.
  (1) Make a step to secure capabilities to attack enemy bases while developing missile defense capabilities.
  (2) Modify the present interpretation of the collective self-defense right that contradicts the Japan-U.S. alliance.

 

■ Invoke all-out sanctions and take measures to make UNSC resolutions more effective
  The Japanese government is considering a complete embargo on exports to North Korea. In addition, the government should suspend remittances to North Korea and prohibit Japanese and North Korean residents in Japan from travelling between Japan and North Korea to terminate bilateral merchandise, financial and human exchanges. It should also enhance efforts to close loopholes including exchanges through third countries.
  It is also important for Japan to make diplomatic efforts to have the UNSC adopt a new resolution against North Korea. But any resolution may be meaningless unless it is effectively implemented.
  In order to make past and future UNSC resolutions more effective, the Japanese government should take such actions as the following:
  (1) Suspend official development aid and all other assistances to countries that fail to comply with the resolutions.
  (2) Block U.N. agencies from providing any assistance to North Korea.
Regarding the second action, Japan and the United States as the two largest contributors to the United Nations should closely cooperate in exerting pressures on U.N. agencies through such measures as partial suspension of contributions. The government cannot be allowed to provide taxpayers’ money to any organizations that work to run counter to Japan’s national interests.

 

■ Take measures to enhance Japan’s security capabilities and make the Japan-U.S. alliance more effective
  Posing the gravest threat to Japan are more than 150 Rodong medium-range missiles that are operational, rather than the Taepodong missile that was test-fired this time. In order to counter these missiles, the Japanese government should further develop missile defense capabilities and secure capabilities to attack enemy bases.
  At a press conference on September 4, 1998, following North Korea’s test-firing of a Taepodong-1 missile, then Defense Agency Director-General Fukushiro Nukaga referred to the 1956 unified government view: “The Constitution cannot be interpreted as forcing Japan to sit down and wait for its collapse. Attacks on missile and other bases can legally be interpreted as part of justifiable self-defense unless no other options are left to defend Japan.” He then stated: “The view is still effective and such option is available.”
  Nevertheless, the Japanese government has delayed its development of capabilities to attack enemy bases. At a time when North Korea is enhancing its attack capabilities, the Japanese government cannot be allowed to delay the development further.
  The Japanese government should also modify the present interpretation of the collective self-defense right that contradicts the Japan-U.S. alliance.